The Anzac Monument
The Anzac Monument
 

Malta ANZAC War Memorial Committee

South Australia

under the chairmanship of the Hon Consul for Malta in South Australia

Frank Scicluna Dip.Ed OAM JP

 

Requests the pleasure of your company at the

 

ANZAC DINNER DANCE

 

FESTIVAL FUNCTION CENTRE   292 Findon Road, FINDON SA

Saturday 2 April 2011    6.30 p.m. –  midnight

5 Course meal including beer, wine and soft drinks

 Entertainment: CHAD ROMERO’S CABARNET CABARET

Floor Show and ANZAC Exhibition 

Tickets: $60

 

 

                                                 

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Anzac War Memorial (Malta) Committee  

Adelaide - South Australia

 

Chairman: Frank L Scicluna, Secretary: Jo Emms (manager@malteseagedcare.com), Charles Figallo, Edgar Agius (President Maltese Community Council), Joe Briffa (Organiser), Valentine Farrugia, Charles Farrugia (RSL), Miriam Jackson, Lawrie Caruana and John Mangion. 

 

 

MALTA’S CONTRIBUTION AT GALLIPOLI IN WORLD WAR 1

 

ANZAC Day - 25 April - is probably Australia's most important national occasion. It marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. The soldiers in those forces quickly became known as ANZACs, and the pride they soon took in that name endures to this day.

 

Among those who died at Anzac Cove during this terrible siege was a Maltese/Australian soldier by the name of Charles Bonavia. His body, like many others, was never found.

Several Maltese/Australians, including Charles Emanuel Bonavia, fought side by side with the Australian troops. Bonavia was born in Malta in 1888. His father was the registrar at the Malta Law Courts and his grandfather rose to the rank of Colonel in the Royal Malta Fencible Artillery. Bonavia studied architecture at the University of Malta and migrated to Australia in 1911. (Photo above) Captain Henry Curmi, who fought at Gallipoli in 1915, many years later, was appointed Malta's Commissioner in Australia.  

He joined the11th Battalion 3rd Infantry Brigade and sailed with his regiment from Fremantle to Egypt on 2 November 1914. Bonavia's name is included in the list of the fallen soldiers at Lone Pine and also at the National War Memorial in Canberra. Other Maltese whose names are forever recorded at Helles Memorial overlooking the Dardanelles are Major Herbert Sammut who died when he was in command of Essex Regiment and Lieutenant Herbert Huber. Huber was a member of the Royal Iniskilling Fusiliers and was killed few hours before the British forces successfully evacuated from the Turkish soil. Unfortunately, their remains were never discovered.

Many other Maltese migrants were among the casualties at Gallipoli. According to the Maltese historian, John Mizzi, there were 800 Maltese labourers serving under Maltese officers in Gallipoli. A young private, Giuseppe Camilleri, was 27 years old when he was killed in enemy action. He was buried close to the beach at Ari Burnu cemetery, near Anzac Cove (Row J, Grave4).

Indeed, Malta played a significant role in the Gallipoli campaign, not only as a backup base for the Royal Navy but also as one of the major hospitals in the Mediterranean. There were also convalescent centres and looked after 58,000 servicemen wounded during the World War I.

There are 1,500 British and 202 Australian servicemen and 72 New Zealanders buried in Malta as well as French, Indians and Egyptians together with 26 Turkish prisoners. This was Malta's greatest contribution to the Allied's efforts during this terrible war.   The early Maltese settlers have indeed given their contribution to preserve freedom and democracy in their adopted home- Australia. Let us hope that the nations of the earth are emerging from the self-destructive practices of enmity and will build, in sunlight, a world of peace, democracy and social justice

 

Malta to host an Anzac Memorial outside Australia

An Anzac memorial is to be erected in Malta - the first Anzac monument outside Australia - following a competition to select the design. The aim of the Anzac memorial in Malta would be to remember and honour the many Australian and New Zealand troops who died at Gallipoli during World War I and in subsequent battles elsewhere in World War II, during which Malta featured prominently, Anzac Memorial committee chairman Nicholas Bonello said. About 300 soldiers from Australia and New Zealand are buried in Malta. From the five competition entries - the competition was held last October - it was the work of Ganni Bonnici that was chosen, and he was yesterday awarded Lm500 in prize money.Mr Bonnici said the exact dimensions of the monument had yet to be established, but it was likely to stand about six metres tall.

The two figures, which it incorporates, would be life-size, or larger, and made of bronze, while the rest would be constructed from local materials. He said the idea behind his design was not to represent war and weapons, but rather the humanity that defended it and those who lost their lives fighting for their country

.Not only soldiers perished but their families suffered, so Mr Bonnici chose to incorporate a man and a woman in the memorial. Keeping it simple, so that its interpretation would be open to the viewer's imagination, the artist said.

  

ANZAC WAR MEMORIAL IN MALTA

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN CONTRIBUTION

 

A number of Maltese background in Adelaide are willing to raise funds to establish an Anzac Memorial in Malta. That might sound somewhat unusual but, as I understand it, outside of Turkey, and except in Australia and New Zealand, there are no other Anzac memorials in the world.

 

The Maltese are particularly drawn to the Anzac tragedy because during World War I more than 4,000 wounded soldiers were evacuated from Gallipoli and hospitalised in Malta. Many passed away in Malta and their remains were returned to Australia and New Zealand, but a number were buried in Malta. Of those soldiers, who were evacuated from Gallipoli and hospitalised in Malta, 202 members of the Australian Imperial Force and During World War Two ships of the Royal Australian Navy assisted in escorting convoys to the Maltese Islands, while pilots from Australia and New Zealand formed part of the air defence and offensive operations. As a result of this conflict there are 24 members of the Royal Australian Air Force and 7 members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force buried on the island. 72 members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force are buried in Malta.


In the late 1940s and 1950s thousands migrated from Malta to Australia to establish a better home and life and they maintained close contact with Malta. Now a number of them in their twilight years have returned to Malta but still maintain a close liaison with their families here in Australia, helping to build virtual bridges between our two nations.


The Consulate of Malta in South Australia is urging the members of the community in Adelaide to assist financially for the construction of this impressive monument. I take this opportunity also to alert our Federal and State governments to the great work these people are doing to continue to cement the relationship between Malta and Australia by recognising the great contribution of many people who migrated to Australia—in excess of 400,000—and the way they have played their part in their new country, mindful of their traditions and heritage and also of the impact Australia has made in the world.

 

Many Maltese over the years worked hard to revive the memory of Australians and New Zealanders who fell and were buried in Malta during World War I. This proposed Anzac memorial in Malta is a way to say ‘thank you’ to Australia and New Zealand.


For many years the Australian-Malta Association in Malta has held an Anzac service to commemorate those who have fallen. I do not know of too many countries outside Turkey, Australia and New Zealand that do the same. In South Australia we have an RSL branch of Maltese veterans, who take much pride in marching on Anzac Day in memory of their fallen comrades.

What is believed to be the first ANZAC memorial outside of Australia and New Zealand is expected to be erected in Malta. This was disclosed during a media conference by Mr. Nicholas Bonello, Chairman of the Anzac Memorial Committee, which was held in Malta on Monday 17th July, 2006.

 

The idea of erecting an ANZAC Memorial in Malta is to honour and commemorate the many Australian and New Zealand troops who have lost their lives in Gallipoli during World War One and elsewhere during subsequent battles and conflicts especially those of World War Two during which Malta featured prominently, and suffered badly.

 

Malta was a British colony at the time of the Gallipoli campaign in 1915. Apart from the fact that many of its nationals served with the armed forces. A large number of sick and wounded men were evacuated to Malta for medical treatment from Gallipoli. This contribution resulted in Malta becoming known as the Nurse of the Mediterranean.

However, despite the efforts of the medical staff, some of the casualties did not recover and were buried on the island. Amongst these are 202 members of the Australian Imperial Force and 72 members of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force.

During World War Two ships of the Royal Australian Navy assisted in escorting convoys to the Maltese Islands, while pilots from Australia and New Zealand formed part of the air defence and offensive operations. As a result of this conflict there are 24 members of the Royal Australian Air Force and 7 members of the Royal New Zealand Air Force buried on the island.

 

The ANZAC Memorial Committee Malta was formed in February 2005 under the auspices of the Maltese Australian Association with the cooperation of the Australian and New Zealand High Commissions for Malta.

 

The Committee is composed of representatives of the Maltese Australian Association, Friends of Australia Association, Maltese Australian Chamber of Commerce, the Australian High Commission, the Hon Consul for New Zealand in Malta, Two well-known media personalities, a lawyer and an architect. All officials and members serving on the ANZAC Memorial Committee-Malta serve in an honorary capacity.

 

In August 2005 the Memorial Committee launched a competition for a design of the monument. A number of entries were received and the winner of the competition was announced during the media conference of the 17th July 2006.

The winner of the design competition, Maltese sculptor Ganni Bonnici exhibited a model of the proposed monument which is to be erected at the Argotti Gardens in Floriana. These gardens are open to the public every day and are well patronised by the public.

 

A formal application for the erection of the proposed memorial was lodged with the Malta Environment and Planning Authority MEPA was made in November 2006.

MEPA, after contacting the various relative agencies concerned, none of which had any objections, did not accept the application. The reasons given were in our opinion very weak, so it was decided to appeal against their decision.

 

The appeals board, made a site inspection and also heard our submissions, subsequently decided in our favour and in mid April 2009 issued the relative permit for us to go ahead with the project.

The memorial will be made of local hard stone, which is similar to marble, with the two figures will be cast in bronze. It is hoped that when eventually the memorial will be erected, it will be the focal point of the local ANZAC Day ceremony.

 

 

A MESSAGE FROM

H.E. Anne Quinane -  Australian High Commissioner in Malta

Australia and Malta enjoy a warm and productive partnership based on shared values and interests, underpinned by strong people-to-people links.

The Maltese migrant community in Australia, the largest outside of Malta, has contributed greatly to the development of a multicultural Australia. This important connection is supported by bilateral agreements covering social security, double taxation, health services, air services and a working holiday maker scheme. Trade and investment, and cooperation in education, are further dimensions of the relationship.

Many wounded ANZACs were evacuated to Malta from Gallipoli in 1915, when Malta earned the title "Nurse of the Mediterranean". A number of them found their last resting place on Maltese shores, creating yet another link between our two countries.

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ANZAC WAR MEMORIAL COMMITTEE – MALTA

 

 

UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE MALTESE AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION

 

With the cooperation of the

Australian and New Zealand High Commissions for Malta

 

Nicholas Bonello OAM, Chairman. Jasen Aquilina, Secretary. Victor Borg, Treasurer. Harry - Josephine Zammit Cordina OAM, PRO. Michael Ellul A&CE, Technical Adviser. Christian Cardona LLD, Legal Adviser. Members, Joseph Xerri,   Joseph Buttigieg,   Arthur Day,   Joseph-Miriam Pavia Daniela Kaufmann,

Representing the Australian High Commission. Jill Camilleri,

Hon Consul for New Zealand Project Manager. Hermann Bonnici, A&CE

 

The ANZAC Memorial Committee Malta was formed in February 2005 under the auspices of the Maltese Australian Association with the cooperation of the Australian and New Zealand High Commissions.

 

The Committee is composed of representatives of the Maltese Australian Association, Friends of Australia Association, Maltese Australian Chamber of Commerce, the Australian High Commission, the Hon Consul for New Zealand in Malta, Two well-known media personalities, a lawyer and an architect. All officials and members serving on the ANZAC Memorial Committee-Malta serve in an honorary capacity.

Webmaster: F. Scicluna - honconsul@live.com.au

ANZAC Memorial in Malta
ANZAC Memorial in Malta

Maltese Community in SA

  • Maltese Consulate for Malta
  • Maltese Community Council of SA
  • Maltese Guild of South Australia
  • Maltese Language School of Adelaide
  • Maltese Senior Citizens Association
  • St Catherine Association of SA
  • Maltese Aged Care Association of SA
  • Maltese Chaplaincy Festivities Committee
  • Society of Christian Doctrine
  • Maltese Community Program on 5EBIFM
  • Blue Grotto Radio on 5PBAFM
  • RSL Maltese Sub-branch
  • Maltese Queen of Victories Band